Knowledge base

Knowledge base

Knowledge base

Knowledge base

Data ecosystem

A data ecosystem is a collection of infrastructures, analytics, and applications used to capture and analyze data. Data ecosystems provide organizations with data they rely on to better understand their customers and make better pricing, operations and marketing decisions. The term ecosystem is used instead of "environment" because, like real ecosystems, data ecosystems are meant to evolve over time.
Knowledge base

Machine Learning

Machine learning (ML) is a type of artificial intelligence (AI) that allows software applications to become more accurate at predicting outcomes without being explicitly programmed to do so. Machine learning algorithms use historical data as input to predict new output values. Machine learning is important to organizations because it provides insight into trends such as customer behavior and operational business patterns and because it supports the development of new products and services.
Knowledge base

Digital Twin

A digital twin is a virtual representation that serves as the real time digital counterpart of a physical object or process (e.g. devices, buildings, factories). As more complex "devices" become interconnected with the ability to produce data, having a digital equivalent gives professionals the opportunity to optimize implementations for maximum efficiency.
Knowledge base

IoT based streaming analysis

IoT based streaming analytics is the processing and analysis of fast moving live data from various sources, including IoT devices, to generate automated real time actions or alerts. IoT based streaming analytics is essential for organizations that want to analyze and integrate information from IoT devices in real time.
Knowledge base

Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is the delivery of various computing services through the cloud. You can think of: servers, storage, databases, network functions, software, analysis functions and artificial intelligence. This gives end users faster innovations, flexible resources, economies of scale and access to their software and applications anytime, anywhere.
Knowledge base

Cell LAC

The Location Area Code (LAC), is the unique number given to each location area within the network. The served area of ​​a cellular radio access network is often subdivided into location areas, consisting of one or more radio cells. The LAC is used as a unique reference for the location of a mobile subscriber. This code is required to address the subscriber with an incoming message (DATA, SMS or VOICE).
Knowledge base

Nano BTS base station

A Nano BTS is a base station of the GSM network whose range is limited. It is used in places where the mobile network has poor coverage. A Nano BTS provides higher data rates and can support more users.
Knowledge base

Cell-ID

A GSM Cell-ID (CID) is a unique number by which GSM towers or the sector of the GSM tower can be identified within a location area code (LAC) or a GSM network. The first or last digits of a CID represent the sector ID. For example, if a secured M2M or LTE M simcard sees one cell tower, its Cell ID is released.
Knowledge base

Smart City

A Smart City is a city where a high quality of life is created and sustainable economic developments are achieved by means of Internet of Things applications and information technology. Smart City how to achieve it? This is achieved by excelling in six important foundations: economy, mobility, environment, people, quality of life and government. Cities can improve energy distribution, streamline waste collection, reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality using IoT applications.
Knowledge base

Edge Computing

Devices can perform increasingly complex calculations and process information themselves. This is called 'edge computing': the increased computing power at the place where data is collected, at the edge of the network. Edge Computing how does it work? It makes the system and applications more efficient by removing the components and data services from a centralized server and moving the data closer to the “edge”. This will improve response times and save bandwidth.
Knowledge base

MMTC

Massive Machine Type Communications (mMTC) is one of the three defining features of 5G. The focus of mMTC is to provide connectivity to a large number of devices that transmit a sporadically low amount of data and should have no delay. The mMTC devices are expected to have a very long battery life. A unique feature of this category is that the mMTC devices will be extremely varied in terms of capabilities, cost, energy consumption and transmitting power.
Knowledge base

URLCC

Ultra Reliable Low Latency Communications is one of the three defining features of 5G. Strict demands on both latency and reliability are the distinguishing features of this use case category, which focuses primarily on machine-type communication (MTC). Applications of URLCC include wireless control of industrial production and manufacturing processes, remote medical surgery, self-driving and/or remote-controlled vehicles and automation of distribution in smart grids.